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Writing PHP Git Hooks with Static Review

If you’ve been using Git for more than a short length of time, you’ll hopefully have heard of Git hooks. If not, Git hooks, as Andrew Udvare introduced here on SitePoint back in August of last year, are scripts which run, based on certain events in the Git lifecycle, both on the client and on the server.

Hook illustration

There are hooks for pre- and post-commit, pre- and post-update, pre-push, pre-rebase, and so on. The sample hooks are written in Bash, one of the Linux shell languages. But they can be written in almost any language you’re comfortable or proficient with.

As Tim Boronczyk pointed out in September 2013, there are a wide range of meaningful purposes which hooks can be put to. These include linting, spell-checking commit messages, checking patches against accepted coding standards, running composer, and so on.

Now, PHP’s a great language, don’t get me wrong, but it’s not necessarily the best language for shell scripting. Admittedly, it’s gotten a lot better than it once was. But compared to languages such as Bash, Python, and Ruby, it hasn’t been quite as suitable for creating Git hooks; that is, until now.

Thanks to Static Review, by Samuel Parkinson, you can now write Git hooks with native PHP, optionally building on the existing core classes. In today’s post, I’m going to give you a tour of what’s on offer, finishing up by writing a custom class to check for any lingering calls to var_dump().

Installing the Library

Like most, if not all modern PHP libraries and packages, StaticReview is installable via Composer. To install it in your project, run composer require sjparkinson/static-review in the root of your project. With that, let’s get going.

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